What We're About

What’s the point of the Disinformation Resistance Community (DRC)?
Members of the DRC find and assess important information that should be Distrusted or Trusted. The DRC enables consumers to block Distrusted from view so they are not adversely affected by disinformation.
What benefits can I obtain by becoming a member of the DRC?
Members can fully participate in contributing knowledge, assessing information, and collaborating with other Trusted members. Members can personalize the blacklists and whitelists used in filtering.
How do I search the Internet while blocking Distrusted content?
The DRC search function invites you to show or block content based on its content and its trustworthiness assessment. Knowledge contributed by members can also be searched and filtered
What’s your Knowledge Bank (KB) for and how can I use it?
Our KB contains refined and Trusted knowledge of several types:
  • Pearls are short essays
  • Nuggets contain Facts and their evidence
  • Gems identify Trusted articles that answer key questions
  • Jewels link key questions to the Facts that answer them
Members can formulate Conjectures they want other members to assess.
How can I most effectively help fight disinformation?
Become an active member of the DRC:
  • Challenge false, misleading, or biased information as Distrusted
  • Endorse credible and evidence-based information as Trusted
  • Up vote unassessed articles and Conjectures you find important
  • Contribute to our Knowledge Bank and share it
Model safe behaviors for producing and sharing information:
  • Avoid reading and reproducing Distrusted information
  • Carefully assess information before endorsing it as Trusted
  • Learn and communicate the dangers of disinformation
What’s the point of the Disinformation Resistance Community (DRC)?
Members of the DRC find and assess important information that should be Distrusted or Trusted. The DRC enables consumers to block Distrusted from view so they are not adversely affected by disinformation.
What benefits can I obtain by becoming a member of the DRC?
Members can fully participate in contributing knowledge, assessing information, and collaborating with other Trusted members. Members can personalize the blacklists and whitelists used in filtering.
How do I search the Internet while blocking Distrusted content?
The DRC search function invites you to show or block content based on its content and its trustworthiness assessment. Knowledge contributed by members can also be searched and filtered.
What’s your Knowledge Bank (KB) for and how can I use it?
Our KB contains refined and Trusted knowledge of several types:
  • Pearls are short essays
  • Nuggets contain Facts and their evidence
  • Gems identify Trusted articles that answer key questions
  • Jewels link key questions to the Facts that answer them
Members can formulate Conjectures they want other members to assess.
How can I most effectively help fight disinformation?
Become an active member of the DRC:
  • Challenge false, misleading, or biased information as Distrusted
  • Endorse credible and evidence-based information as Trusted
  • Up vote unassessed articles and Conjectures you find important
  • Contribute to our Knowledge Bank and share it
Model safe behaviors for producing and sharing information:
  • Avoid reading and reproducing Distrusted information
  • Carefully assess information before endorsing it as Trusted
  • Learn and communicate the dangers of disinformation

I want to ...

Anonymous Visitor quick intro to the DRC Website

The DRC is a crowdsourced effort to combat disinformation. Members find and assess the trustworthiness of information on the web; determine what is Trusted and what is Distrusted; and populate the Knowledge Bank with fact-based articles. Consumers can use the TrustedSearch tool to browse the web without being adversely affected by disinformation. In its simplest form, TrustedSearch shows only Trusted content from the Internet or from the DRC Knowledge Bank.  If you click on “Advanced Search,” you can show or block content based on its trustworthiness assessment, can choose whether to show or block content from the Internet or from the DRC Knowledge Bank (KB), and can choose which Filters to assess trustworthiness. Members of the DRC benefit from a personal Watchlist that continually scans the Internet and KB for NEW items of interest. They can also customize Filters. The DRC offers members many additional capabilities, especially contributing trustworthiness assessments and other content.

Enrolled Member quick intro to the DRC Website

The DRC is a crowdsourced effort to combat disinformation. Members find and assess the trustworthiness of information on the web; determine what is Trusted and what is Distrusted; and populate the Knowledge Bank (KB) with fact-based articles. Consumers can use the TrustedSearch tool to browse the web without being adversely affected by disinformation.  If you click on “Advanced Search,” you can show or block content based on its trustworthiness assessment, can choose whether to show or block content from the Internet or from the DRC KB, and can choose which Filters to assess trustworthiness. Each Member benefits from a personal Watchlist of up to 5 search queries specifying topics of great personal interest. Upon logging in, the Member sees how many NEW articles are available about these topics. The Member can efficiently track topics of interest in this way, reading summaries of the NEW articles before going deeper. OLD articles are available from the Watchlist as well. The Watchlist remembers all view and Filter choices from the search queries stored in the Watchlist.  Members can customize Filters and create a personal My Own Filter specifying Trusted and Distrusted sources.  Members can vote on which Unassessed articles, Conjectures, and Wishes they want someone to assess.

See trustworthiness assessments on Internet articles and Knowledge Bank (KB) entries

Whenever our site displays articles and objects, we show with small icons to their left the associated trustworthiness assessments, with a green check mark for Trusted, red X mark for Distrusted, and gray question mark for Unassessed. You can choose which assessments you wish to SHOW or BLOCK in the VIEW OPTIONS under the Filtered Information Search bar. We consider items as Trusted when they are endorsed by a member or when they originate at a site or source that is Trusted according to one of the Filters you employ.  Similarly, items challenged by a member or originating from a source one of your Filters assesses as Distrusted.

Pearl Links

Search for Trusted content on the Internet

On the home page, the top center field asks you to provide keywords, tags, or a URL you’d like to search for and the box below that lets you express three types of options:

  1. You can choose to SHOW (include) or BLOCK (exclude) search results with Trusted, Unassessed, or Distrusted assessments.
  2. You can choose whether to  SHOW (include) or BLOCK (exclude) search results from the Internet or from the DRC community content.
  3. You can choose whether to employ one or more available Filters that assess the trustworthiness of numerous sources and sites.

If you move the sliders to SHOW Trusted and SHOW Internet Content, Trusted Internet search results will be presented. 

Contribute a Conjecture to the KB expressing a claim you’d like to see confirmed or refuted

A Conjecture contains a speculative factual claim that the author would like to see Endorsed as Trusted Any member can create a Conjecture and all Conjectures are considered Unassessed, meaning that no one has yet Endorsed the claim as Trusted or Challenged the claim as Distrusted.  The example here speculates that more than 1 million people die annually in automobile accidents. When you Endorse a Conjecture, you actually convert it to a Fact claim contained within a Nugget. The Nugget also records the Evidence you provide for that claim as well as a discussion of how the evidence justifies the claim.  When you Challenge a Conjecture, you actually convert it to a Sham claim that belongs to a Nugget.  In this case, you are saying the speculative claim of the Conjecture should be Distrusted, and that’s the role of a Sham claim within a Nugget.  The most important claim in a Nugget, however, is the Fact Claim, which must be Trusted.  So for you to complete your Challenge of a Conjecture, you must formulate a complementary claim to the Sham, one that you have evidence should be Trusted.  In this way, we convert incorrect Conjectures into valued factual claims and, optionally, reveal to others the Sham claim that the Nugget refutes.

Up vote any Unassessed article, Wish or Conjecture to encourage members to  vote for it or endorse it

Within the DRC, items that haven’t yet been assessed as either Trusted or Distrusted represent opportunities for Member actions.  These Unassessed items can include Internet articles identified by the URL, speculative Conjectures in the KB, or Wishes describing potential improvements to the platform. We give priority to Unassessed items with the greatest vote counts. Any member can UP vote one of these items to indicate support for the items, or DOWN vote it to show the member disfavors the item. In the case of a Conjecture, the UP vote signals that the voter thinks it’s important to validate the speculative Fact Claim, whereas a DOWN vote signals the voter thinks the speculative Fact Claim should be refuted in favor of a complementary Sham Claim.  Votes for Unassessed Internet articles signal the same thing, namely UP votes indicate shared sentiment that the article should be Endorsed as Trusted, whereas DOWN votes indicate people think it important to Challenge the article as DistrustedUP votes for Wishes indicate support for the suggested capability, whereas DOWN votes indicate sentiment against the suggestion.

Endorse Internet articles and KB objects you assess as Trusted

Members help others find trustworthy information by assigning Trusted assessments to articles they have checked for honesty and civility. To do this, you choose the Endorse action.  This requires you to affirm that you can meet the criteria of the Endorser’s Checklist and that you are prepared to provide any data required to defend your assessment against a subsequent Challenge. When you Endorse an item, you stake your personal reputation on that item being honest and civil, and it means you have confidence the assertions are based on credible evidence. Your assessment of an article as Trusted makes it available to other members and consumers who employ our trust assessments to search and filter out Distrusted or Unassessed items.

Challenge Internet articles and KB objects you assess as Distrusted

The Internet is glutted with fake news and disinformation, and active members of the Disinformation Resistance Community (DRC) work collectively to deprecate those materials and their producers as Distrusted so others can block them and their content from appearing in search results. Articles and sources become Distrusted when members Challenge them and Adjudicators sustain those challenges.  Repeated sustained challenges lead to banishment and permanent Distrusted assessment. Every member can Challenge any Internet article that fails to meet our standards for honesty or civility. First, the challenger identifies the URL of the challenged article. Second, the challenger selects the principal basis for the challenge, including: repeats Distrusted information, makes a Sham claim, hides a conflict of interest, or exhibits bullying.  The challenger then must provide a Citation URL that points to a Trusted source of supporting evidence.  The user then describes “What the evidence shows” to help the Adjudicator assess the Challenge.  The Challenge can be annotated with keywords or tags. The Challenger then affirms that the Challenge meets the requirements of the Challenger’s Checklist and submits the challenge.

Publish an essay in the Pearls section of KB

Any member can publish Trusted essays we call Pearls, as in a “pearl of wisdom.” In this case the author Endorses that the article meets the requirements of the Endorser’s Checklist.  This affirms that the author has fact-checked his article and stands prepared to defend its claims against any subsequent ChallengeMembers of the Community collectively build up a Knowledge Bank of Trusted information that members and other consumers can access to avoid misinformation. When people search for Trusted Community Content, that includes Pearls.  The example at the left illustrates a Pearl.

Publish an evidence-based Trusted claim (a Fact)  by contributing a Nugget to the KB

You can contribute a specific factual claim  to the Knowledge Bank (KB) by providing Evidence that justifies the claim.  We embed the Fact Claim, the Evidence, the Justification supporting trustworthiness of the claim, and a discussion of What the Evidence Shows in a Nugget of knowledge. You can also explicitly include a Sham Claim the Evidence refutes.  The image at the left shows one such Nugget, with the Fact Claim “Bill Gates did not create the Covid-19 virus or help initiate the pandemic.”  The URL Link to the Evidence points to a Trusted article refuting the Sham Claim that Gates created the virus.

Pearl Links

Challenge an Internet article or KB entry that you assess as dishonest or uncivil

You may read an article on the Internet that you find objectionable, either because it makes false claims or because it incorporates bullying or hate speech.  Dishonest and uncivil articles should be assessed as Distrusted, and our members make those assessments by challenging the source. To Challenge an article, you click on the Challenge action and supply the URL of the offensive Internet article. Or if you have found an incorrectly assessed object in the DRC KB, you can Challenge it as well.  In addition to identifying the article or object being challenged, you must select the principal basis for the challenge, including: repeats Distrusted information, makes a Sham claim, hides a conflict of interest, or exhibits bullying.  You must then provide a Citation URL that points to a Trusted source of supporting evidence.  Then, describe “What the evidence shows” to help the Adjudicator assess the Challenge.  The Challenge can be annotated with keywords or tags. Finally, as the challenger, you must affirm your Challenge meets the requirements of the Challenger’s Checklist.  Finally you submit your challenge so that an Adjudicator can evaluate it.

Pearl Links

Create a Gem that cites a Trusted article people can read to answer various questions

Often you will read an interesting and informative article that provides answers to many important questions people might ask. As a member of the DRC, you can make others aware of that article by citing it within a Gem in the Knowledge Bank (KB).  The purpose of the Gem is to guide people to Trusted articles other members have found useful in answering questions. Gems don’t list individual answers to questions, but they tell readers what to read to find those answers. Gems save people time but do not eliminate the need for reading and understanding articles in natural language.  When you list the questions your Gem addresses, each question must begin with one of the 5Ws or H words:  Who, What, When, Where, Why or How.  When you create a Gem you are Endorsing the Gem and the article with answers it cites as Trusted.  

    An example Gem is shown here.  This Gem addresses questions regarding the value of a human life in the manner policy makers should, permitting them to trade-off deaths and dollars.

Pearl Links

Provide factual answers to multiple questions by creating a Jewel listing Q-A pairs

Members of the DRC collectively create a Knowledge Bank (KB) so that others can quickly find Trusted answers to their own questions.  Individual answers are encapsulated as Fact Claims within KB Nuggets.  But generally people search for information when they are pursuing questions, so members can create Jewels in the KB that list specific questions and their specific answers.  Every answer cited by a Jewel is a Fact Claim embodied in a KB Nugget.  The Jewel may list any number of questions and, for each, cites a Nugget that contains the answer to that question. Jewels provide each answer as a Fact Claim generally comprising a single sentence.  This eliminates the work required to read an entire article, find relevant information, and translate that information into the answer to each specific question.  To create a Jewel, you must formulate questions and cite one Nugget that answers each.  When you list the questions your Jewel addresses, each question must begin with one of the 5Ws or H words:  Who, What, When, Where, Why or How.  When you create a Jewel you are Endorsing the Jewel as Trusted, as well as providing Trusted answers to each question.  

    An example Jewel is shown here.  This Jewel addresses a number of politically motivated myths about the Covid-19 pandemic.  Each Question in the Jewel is paired with a Nugget Fact that answers the question honestly.

Pearl Links

Make a Wish to ask for a desired feature

The Disinformation Resistance Community (DRC) employs the platform for Communities of Trust provided by Trusted Origins Corporation (TOC). DRC members will undoubtedly identify shortcomings in the platform they’d like to see addressed. Members can describe a capability or feature they’d like to see created by making a Wish.  Every Wish is viewed as an Unassessed object, and all Unassessed objects, including Conjectures and Unassessed Internet articles, and invite voting by members on the importance of that object. Votes signal that Members urge action on the object. Members who agree that the Wish should be addressed should UP vote it, while those who disfavor it should DOWN vote it.  Governors of the DRC will give priority to the most favored Wishes.  The figure provides an example of one such Wish.

Up vote any Unassessed article, Wish or Conjecture to encourage members to  vote for it or endorse it

Within the DRC, items that haven’t yet been assessed as either Trusted or Distrusted represent opportunities for Member actions.  These Unassessed items can include Internet articles identified by the URL, speculative Conjectures in the KB, or Wishes describing potential improvements to the platform. We give priority to Unassessed items with the greatest vote counts. Any member can UP vote one of these items to indicate support for the items, or DOWN vote it to show the member disfavors the item. In the case of a Conjecture, the UP vote signals that the voter thinks it’s important to validate the speculative Fact Claim, whereas a DOWN vote signals the voter thinks the speculative Fact Claim should be refuted in favor of a complementary Sham Claim.  Votes for Unassessed Internet articles signal the same thing, namely UP votes indicate shared sentiment that the article should be Endorsed as Trusted, whereas DOWN votes indicate people think it important to Challenge the article as DistrustedUP votes for Wishes indicate support for the suggested capability, whereas DOWN votes indicate sentiment against the suggestion.

Down vote any Unassessed article, Wish or Conjecture to encourage members to challenge it or vote against it

Within the DRC, items that haven’t yet been assessed as either Trusted or Distrusted represent opportunities for Member actions.  These Unassessed items can include Internet articles identified by the URL, speculative Conjectures in the KB, or Wishes describing potential improvements to the platform. We give priority to Unassessed items with the greatest vote counts. Any member can UP vote one of these items to indicate support for the items, or DOWN vote it to show the member disfavors the item. In the case of a Conjecture, the UP vote signals that the voter thinks it’s important to validate the speculative Fact Claim, whereas a DOWN vote signals the voter thinks the speculative Fact Claim should be refuted in favor of a complementary Sham Claim.  Votes for Unassessed Internet articles signal the same thing, namely UP votes indicate shared sentiment that the article should be Endorsed as Trusted, whereas DOWN votes indicate people think it important to Challenge the article as DistrustedUP votes for Wishes indicate support for the suggested capability, whereas DOWN votes indicate sentiment against the suggestion.

Up vote any Unassessed article, Wish or Conjecture to encourage members to  vote for it or endorse it

Within the DRC, items that haven’t yet been assessed as either Trusted or Distrusted represent opportunities for Member actions.  These Unassessed items can include Internet articles identified by the URL, speculative Conjectures in the KB, or Wishes describing potential improvements to the platform. We give priority to Unassessed items with the greatest vote counts. Any member can UP vote one of these items to indicate support for the items, or DOWN vote it to show the member disfavors the item. In the case of a Conjecture, the UP vote signals that the voter thinks it’s important to validate the speculative Fact Claim, whereas a DOWN vote signals the voter thinks the speculative Fact Claim should be refuted in favor of a complementary Sham Claim.  Votes for Unassessed Internet articles signal the same thing, namely UP votes indicate shared sentiment that the article should be Endorsed as Trusted, whereas DOWN votes indicate people think it important to Challenge the article as DistrustedUP votes for Wishes indicate support for the suggested capability, whereas DOWN votes indicate sentiment against the suggestion.

See trustworthiness assessments on Internet articles and Knowledge Bank (KB) entries

Whenever our site displays articles and objects, we show with small icons to their left the associated trustworthiness assessments, with a green check mark for Trusted, red X mark for Distrusted, and gray question mark for Unassessed. You can choose which assessments you wish to SHOW or BLOCK in the VIEW OPTIONS under the Filtered Information Search bar. We consider items as Trusted when they are endorsed by a member or when they originate at a site or source that is Trusted according to one of the Filters you employ.  Similarly, items challenged by a member or originating from a source one of your Filters assesses as Distrusted.

Pearl Links

See trustworthiness assessments on Internet articles and Knowledge Bank (KB) entries

Whenever our site displays articles and objects, we show with small icons to their left the associated trustworthiness assessments, with a green check mark for Trusted, red X mark for Distrusted, and gray question mark for Unassessed. You can choose which assessments you wish to SHOW or BLOCK in the VIEW OPTIONS under the Filtered Information Search bar. We consider items as Trusted when they are endorsed by a member or when they originate at a site or source that is Trusted according to one of the Filters you employ.  Similarly, items challenged by a member or originating from a source one of your Filters assesses as Distrusted.

Pearl Links

Block Distrusted content in searches

On the home page, the top center field asks you to provide keywords, tags, or a URL you’d like to search for and the box below that lets you express three types of options:

  1. You can choose to SHOW (include) or BLOCK (exclude) search results with Trusted, Unassessed, or Distrusted assessments.
  2. You can choose whether to SHOW (include) or BLOCK (exclude) search results from the Internet or from the DRC community content.
  3. You can choose whether to employ one or more available

 

 

Pearl Links

Up vote any Unassessed article, Wish or Conjecture to encourage members to  vote for it or endorse it

Within the DRC, items that haven’t yet been assessed as either Trusted or Distrusted represent opportunities for Member actions.  These Unassessed items can include Internet articles identified by the URL, speculative Conjectures in the KB, or Wishes describing potential improvements to the platform. We give priority to Unassessed items with the greatest vote counts. Any member can UP vote one of these items to indicate support for the items, or DOWN vote it to show the member disfavors the item. In the case of a Conjecture, the UP vote signals that the voter thinks it’s important to validate the speculative Fact Claim, whereas a DOWN vote signals the voter thinks the speculative Fact Claim should be refuted in favor of a complementary Sham Claim.  Votes for Unassessed Internet articles signal the same thing, namely UP votes indicate shared sentiment that the article should be Endorsed as Trusted, whereas DOWN votes indicate people think it important to Challenge the article as DistrustedUP votes for Wishes indicate support for the suggested capability, whereas DOWN votes indicate sentiment against the suggestion.

Pearl Links

Provide factual answers to multiple questions by creating a Jewel listing Q-A pairs

Members of the DRC collectively create a Knowledge Bank (KB) so that others can quickly find Trusted answers to their own questions.  Individual answers are encapsulated as Fact Claims within KB Nuggets.  But generally people search for information when they are pursuing questions, so members can create Jewels in the KB that list specific questions and their specific answers.  Every answer cited by a Jewel is a Fact Claim embodied in a KB Nugget.  The Jewel may list any number of questions and, for each, cites a Nugget that contains the answer to that question. Jewels provide each answer as a Fact Claim generally comprising a single sentence.  This eliminates the work required to read an entire article, find relevant information, and translate that information into the answer to each specific question.  To create a Jewel, you must formulate questions and cite one Nugget that answers each.  When you list the questions your Jewel addresses, each question must begin with one of the 5Ws or H words:  Who, What, When, Where, Why or How.  When you create a Jewel you are Endorsing the Jewel as Trusted, as well as providing Trusted answers to each question.  

    An example Jewel is shown here.  This Jewel addresses a number of politically motivated myths about the Covid-19 pandemic.  Each Question in the Jewel is paired with a Nugget Fact that answers the question honestly.

Pearl Links

Expect your contributions to persist, indefinitely

Our three principal values at the DRC include honesty, civility and transparency. We require that all Members endorse their contributions as honest and civil, and we penalize those who violate those rules. The governors of the DRC become aware of standards violations when a Member Challenges an object or its producer. Challenges go to Adjudicators who evaluate whether the object meets DRC standards for honesty and civility. When an Adjudicator reaches a decision, the trustworthiness assessment of the object might change, the producer of the object might receive a penalty or, in rare cases, the challenger might receive a penalty. One or two penalties lead to loss of membership privileges and permanent banishment from the community. We aim to provide maximum transparency into these decisions and outcomes by making all Endorsements, Challenges, and Adjudications persistent.  All Trusted and Distrusted objects are permanently maintained and visible.  Unassessed objects become permanent after they receive any votes, as well.  A Conjecture is converted into a Nugget when someone Endorses or Challenges it. The speculative Fact Claim of a Conjecture becomes a Trusted Fact Claim of its containing Nugget after someone Endorses the Conjecture. Likewise, the speculative Fact Claim of a Conjecture becomes a Sham Claim of a Nugget after someone Challenges the Conjecture as Distrusted.

Pearl Links

Understand Filters and how they assess articles

A Filter provides trustworthiness assessments for various articles and sources.  We provide several Filters off-the-shelf to apply assessments derived from credible public sources.  Specifically, we have provided initial Filters called Fact Checkers, Media Bias, Haters & Bullies, EU vs Disinfo, and Wikipedia SourcesThe Fact Checkers Filter  assesses articles from professional fact checkers as Trusted.  The Media Bias Filter assesses extremely biased and mendacious media sites as Distrusted while trusting reliably factual sites as Trusted.  The Haters & Bullies Filter assesses SPLC-identified extremists and their digital products as DistrustedEUvsDisinfo treats Russian disinformation as Distrusted.  The last Filter applies assessments of Trusted to perennially trustworthy sources and Distrusted to frequently unreliable sources, according to Wikipedia editors. You may choose which of these Filters, if any, to employ when searching for Internet content.  The Filters are searched in order, and the first one to apply determines the reported trustworthiness assessment.  You may edit and change the predetermined assessments by clicking on the Filter and then changing any of its trustworthiness assessments.  Each change you make is added to My Own Filter, and this Filter takes priority over the off-the-shelf FiltersMy Own, when selected, is the first Filter applied.  Over time, we anticipate journalists and others may want to publish their own curated Premium Filters for subscribing members. 

Pearl Links

All FAQs

The DRC works actively to assess the trustworthiness of articles and to build a trusted base of knowledge. Our members benefit from the common efforts, because it enables all of them to consume trustworthy information. Further, consumers who have access to our trust assessments can use our technology to avoid consuming toxic disinformation. We welcome active and passive members. Active members assess information and build shared knowledge. Passive members enjoy the consumption of trustworthy information and avoid the toxic effects of consuming lies.

The DRC is the premier Community of Trust built atop the platform created by Trusted Origins Corp. (TOC). TOC is a California Public Benefits corporation dedicated to removing toxic information from the Internet. The approach pioneered by TOC relies upon authenticating human members who commit to honesty and civility in their communications. Honesty, as prescribed by the Endorser’s Checklist, requires authors to distinguish between facts and opinions, eschew lies or other misrepresentations, and avoid bias that arises from conflicts of interest. Civility, as defined by the Code of Conduct, requires that members communicate civilly. That code forbids bullying and hate speech, among other objectionable behaviors. Each Community of Trust hosted on the TOC platform is self-governing, including a Governor and an Advisory Board. The Community pays a portion of its revenues (currently 30%) to the platform provider for its technology and services, but retains the rest (currently 70%) to cover its own costs and pursue its own aims.

Yes, thankfully, we are standing on the shoulders of giants. Some organizations, such as the European Union strategic program on disinformation, have focused on exposing Russian lies and disinformation campaigns for years. They provide quality assessments, and we gratefully import their trust assessments. Many organizations engage in fact checking other sources, and we also incorporate their trust signals where possible. Hundreds of professionals and academics investigate mechanisms and products of disinformation campaigns. We hope they will all become members of the DRC. We would very much like to see the DRC become the common global community of people actively working to rid the world of disinformation.

The Internet is a vast space with many cesspools of toxic information. We aim to exposes as much of it as possible for our members to assess and blacklist, as appropriate. We focus initially on articles with URIs that our members identify or that appear in search results. Any member can endorse or challenge any article by assessing the content using our Checklists. Once a member assesses the article’s trustworthiness, the Trusted or Distrusted status determines how that article appears to all other members or consumers using technology to filter content based on trust signals. Over time, we hope to interest operators of other platforms and walled gardens to incorporate our trust signals and filtered viewing as well.

Yes. Members can author their own trusted articles, termed Pearls. Every member endorses as Trusted any Pearls they compose for the community.

We work collectively to fight information pollution on the Internet. We focus on disinformation campaigns typically funded and orchestrated by miscreants for financial or political purposes. Our members have “skin in the game,” staking their membership and reputations on being honest and civil. We authenticate members as identified humans and then hold them accountable for adhering to community behavior standards. We block bots, who cannot authenticate as identified humans, and our members call out trolls, shills and bullies when they violate those standards. Our members challenge articles that fail fact checks or exhibit bullying and hate speech. When those challenges are affirmed by our adjudicators, the authors and publications are penalized as in FIFA football, receiving a warning, yellow card or red card. Two yellow cards or one red card means the community banishes the author or publication. Once banished from the community, the miscreants join a backlist used to warn readers that those sources are Distrusted. . Our members can also endorse the trustworthiness of articles they read, placing them on a whitelist of Trusted articles. Our members can search for content on the Internet and rely on these trustworthiness assessments to highlight or filter out articles based on their trustworthiness assessments. We provide ways for members to import trustworthiness assessments from other providers and to employ those in filtering too.

Members can create all of the following types of content, in addition to Pearls:

  • Comment: factual and civil feedback on articles and other content.
  • Nugget: a Trusted evidence-based factual claim, along with an optional Distrusted sham claim.
  • Endorsement: an assessment of Trusted for some previously unassessed article.
  • Challenge: an evidence-based argument that a Trusted or Unassessed article should be Distrusted or that a current assessment of Trusted should be changed to Distrusted.
  • Conjecture: An interesting or important claim that needs assessment.
  • Gem: A pointer to a Trusted article that answers important questions.
  • Jewel: A set of questions each answered by a Nugget’s factual claim.

Members of the DRC find and assess important information that should be Distrusted or Trusted. The DRC enables consumers to block Distrusted from view so they are not adversely affected by disinformation.

Members can contribute knowledge, assess information, UP Vote or DOWN Vote Conjectures and Wishes, and collaborate with other Trusted members. On arrival, members immediately inspect NEW search results matching their specific Watchlist queries and avoid continually re-reading OLD articles. Each member can specify trustworthiness assessments in My Own Filter that supersede assessments by others.

The DRC  TrustedSearchTM function automatically blocks questionable content, specifically presenting only Trusted articles from the Internet or the DRC Knowledge Bank. This makes the DRC site the safest, best source for Trusted Content on the Internet.  In some cases, you might want to see Unassessed or even Distrusted articles. To do that, you choose Advanced Search and then specify which content to SHOW or BLOCK and which Filters to employ for trustworthiness assessments.  

Our KB contains refined and Trusted knowledge of several types:

  • Pearls are short essays
  • Nuggets contain Facts and their evidence
  • Gems identify Trusted articles that answer key questions
  • Jewels link key questions to the Facts that answer them

Members can formulate Conjectures they want other members to assess.

  1. Become an active member of the DRC:
  • Challenge false, misleading, or biased information as Distrusted
  • Endorse credible and evidence-based information as Trusted
  • Up vote unassessed articles and Conjectures you find important
  • Contribute to our Knowledge Bank and share it
  1. Model safe behaviors for producing and sharing information:
  • Avoid reading and reproducing Distrusted information
  • Carefully assess information before endorsing it as Trusted
  • Learn and communicate the dangers of disinformation

The DRC charges annual dues to its members. We expect dues to cover operating expenses. We offer TrustedSearch and other functions at no cost to visiting consumers. In the future, we may permit Trusted advertisers to present honest and civil ads to our members, although we will never sell data about users unless they explicitly opt in. We anticipate offering premium services to our members for additional fees. The DRC pays a portion of its revenues to Trusted Origins Corp. for hosting our Community of Trust.

Our TrustedSearch service obtains Internet content via use of an embedded commercial search engine that provides high-quality results in response to queries. We then apply all selected Filters to the search results to provide trustworthiness assessments. We may change the embedded search engine from time to time to obtain better quality results or improve efficiency.  At present, we employ Azure Cognitive Services to process Internet queries. 

Support

Please use the Contact section below and prepend 'Support: ' in the Short Message field